Sunday, November 28, 2010

BOWEL MOVEMENT - some informations

OBSERVE -AS YOU SIT ON THE THRONE Each morning!

Question #1: How long does it take you to have a bowel movement?

Less than 60 seconds
More than two minutes
Answer: Healthy bowel movements happen within seconds of sitting on the toilet. Stool should easily come out without straining, grunting, or any discomfort. It should have the consistency of toothpaste. If you have time to read a newspaper while sitting on the toilet—you probably have a problem with constipation or poor bowel health.

Question #2: Does your stool sink immediately?

Yes
No
Answer: Fast sinking stool is a sign of a fiber deficiency in your diet. Healthy stool should slowly descend to the bottom of the toilet bowl. If you have a "fast sinker"—add more fiber-rich foods to you diet. These include fruits, vegetables, nuts, and whole grains.
If your stool sticks to the sides of the toilet or leaves "streak marks"—that's a sign of excess fat in your stool. This can be caused by a poor diet or a sluggish liver.

Question #3: What is the shape of your stool?

Long like a banana
Round, hard pellets
Thin, pencil–shaped
Answer: Healthy stool averages about four to six inches long and shaped like a banana or a torpedo.
Very narrow, pencil-shaped stool is a sign your colon walls are impacted or you have polyps or growth on the inside of your colon or rectum. This causes the stool to squeeze to get through. Stress can also create narrow stool.

Hard, round, or pellet-shaped stool is a possible sign of poor liver function, lack of exercise, dehydration, or constipation.

Question #4: Is your stool accompanied by foul odor?

Yes
No
Answer: Gas or odor is a sign of a bacterial imbalance in your intestinal flora. The "bad" bacteria release foul-smelling gases and toxins that can cramp your colon and create embarrassing odors.
You can eliminate this odor by removing debris and encrusted feces from the walls of your intestines and restoring the balance in your intestinal flora.

Question #5: What color is your stool?

Yellow
Green
Brown
Gray
Black
Bright red

Answer: According the Mayo Clinic research, all shades of brown and even green are considered normal stool colors. And the foods you eat can affect the color of your stool. For example, beets, tomato juice, blueberries, popsicles, and green leafy vegetables can affect your stool color. However, a distinct change in stool color can be a warning sign for health problems.
Yellow-colored stool indicates your food is moving too quickly through your digestive tract—as in the case of diarrhea. If stool is greasy or foul-smelling, it may indicate excess fat caused by malabsorption of nutrients.

Green-colored stool means your food isn't properly being processed through your intestines. As a result, bile isn't broken down—and gives your stool that green color. Green stool can also mean you're eating too much sugar, and not enough grains or salt.
Gray or ashy colored stool indicates undigested fats or heavy use of prescription or over-the-counter drugs that contain aluminum hydroxide. It can also indicate a lack of bile in stool that may be caused by a bile duct obstruction or a liver problem.
Black stool is a serious warning sign for bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract—possibly the stomach.

Bright red stool may indicate bleeding in the lower intestinal tract—possibly the large intestine or rectum. Hemorrhoids are usually the source of the bleeding.

Question #6: Do you pass gas while you're having a bowel movement
or have you noticed air or bubbles in your stool?

Yes
No
Answer:Air or bubbles in stool can indicate an intestinal imbalance. Gas producing bacteria may be overgrowing and competing with the healthier flora in your gut.
Please know this: A normal bowel movement happens within 60 seconds of sitting on the toilet. There should be no straining, pain, bleeding or foul odor accompanied with your bowel movements. And wiping afterwards should be easy and simple—using just one or two pieces of toilet paper! (With a little water if u like)

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